The Time is Now for Women to Step Up, Speak Out, and Take Control

On this year’s International Women’s Day, I’d like to reflect on how we can encourage women to speak up, be heard, and support each other. The #metoo movement has brought to light countless examples of abuse, mistreatment, and harassment, but if there is one positive glimmer out of all that is being shared, it’s a sense of solidarity and empowerment.

I believe that entrepreneurship can be a path to channeling that energy and creating positive outcomes. The time is now to step up and speak out. The time is now to take control of your own destiny. Stop saying “I’m sorry” and start saying “I’m ready to make a difference.”

I believe that sometimes making a difference is being your own boss. In my role as Director of MIT’s educational accelerator program, delta v, I work every day with both female and male student entrepreneurs. Some of these students have ideas that may change the world someday, but even more important is their sense of pride and accomplishment when they can make decisions that shape their own direction and have a positive impact on other people.

Maybe being an entrepreneur is not for everyone. But, if and when you are in a position to define your own path, you have turned the tables and now have control. You can help not only yourself but others.

Female Entrepreneurs make a Difference

This infographic from Entrepreneur on female entrepreneurship shows that women are founding companies at historic rates with more than 9 million women-owned businesses in the U.S. today. These businesses will provide over 5 million jobs this year. Interestingly, businesses with a woman on the executive team are also more likely to have significantly higher valuations (64% higher) at Series A. These statistics demonstrate that women are creating new models of leadership, and that is hopefully changing the balance of power.

How to Get Started

Now is the time to be an entrepreneur, yet the hardest thing about entrepreneurship is getting started. Newton’s first law states an object at rest stays at rest unless acted upon by an external force – and this is true for entrepreneurship as well. So, you need to give yourself a push. For inspiration, here are some stories of female entrepreneurs gaining ground at MIT.

Find the focus that is right for you. Entrepreneurship for small and medium enterprises (i.e. opening your own business in an established industry, such as a florist, hair salon, or consultant) is different from innovation-driven entrepreneurship (i.e. the next “big idea”, inventing something new) but they both let you be your own boss.

What are you curious about? What do you dream of doing? How would you get started? Now is the best time. There are many educational resources (online, classes, workshops etc.), and there are a lot of folks who are willing to be mentors. Plus, check out co-working spaces that are great for startups. In the Boston area, we have the CIC in CambridgeVenture CaféWeWork, etc. that also have speakers and educational resources in all areas of building a business.

Resources for Entrepreneurs

On any given day in Boston, there are events that budding entrepreneurs can attend – many are free, or some charge a small fee. Find the one that fits you. The City of Boston just held a series of events for women, Linda Henry runs HUBweek, there are Mass Challenge programs around the world. These all help expose those interested in entrepreneurship to various options. Here are a number of resources and organizations in the Boston and Cambridge area. Search online to find others in your area. Starting a Business (City of Boston)

The activism among several organizations has opened a lot of eyes, and hopefully recognition. Where women were once dismissed, that there are signs that voices should be heard – from women on boards to women funding enterprises. There is positive momentum, and you can make a difference. The time is now. Give yourself that push!

Originally published here in BostInno.

Advertisements

Entrepreneurship: Making the Middle Matter

minnesota-1086095_1920Call it the problem of the middle—the middle states and the middle class—two groups that have struggled with problems that, while they are inexorably linked, are different all the same.

Historically, most of the venture capital in America has been active on the coasts, leaving a vast portion of the country without seed money for innovative new startups. At the same time, the Midwest has suffered from a loss of manufacturing jobs and, as a result, has in some ways failed to flourish in the same ways as other parts of the country. And, of course, there is no shortage of news articles outlining the many struggles facing the middle class, in general, in America.

“We live in a fractured society,” argues MIT economist Peter Temin in an MIT News article on America’s two-track economy. “The middle class is vanishing.”

According to Temin, America now features two sectors: an FTE sector, where people who work in finance, technology, and electronics tend to thrive, and a low-wage sector, where workers often struggle. The middle class, traditionally an area of national strength, is starting to disappear. Moreover, the FTE sector overwhelmingly focused and fixated on both coasts, has for a long time neglected investment opportunities in the Midwest.

Venture capital—specifically venture capital aimed at the oft-ignored middle states—could be part of the solution. The central part of our country is often ignored as an ideas hub. Most accelerators, venture capitalists, and startup programs are focused on a few key cities on the east and west coasts. The Kauffman Foundation, known for its emphasis on education and entrepreneurship, recently published an article focusing on both the middle class and the middle states, asking: “Is the Middle the New Edge?”

It states: “The middle ground is too often dismissed as unremarkable when it is truly necessary. The middle should be appreciated as an admirable place to be – where people work together to solve big problems and move our nation forward.”

Interestingly, research from the Kauffman Foundation shows that while startup activity is half of what it was a generation ago, entrepreneurs are making a comeback – and the mid-country states are particularly active. Of the 10 metro areas with the highest growth in entrepreneurial activity last year, six are in the middle of the country. This short video gives a great overview of how the middle might be able to give our nation a crucial advantage.

One way to energize innovation and entrepreneurship in Middle America is with infusions of capital and training. Steve Case, the billionaire co-founder of AOL, has started a seed fund called Revolution that plans to raise up to $100 million to fund promising startups in the Midwest. J.D. Vance, author of Hillbilly Elegy, has teamed with Case to find the right companies to champion. They are also starting a “Rise of the Rest” tour to educate entrepreneurs and fund pitch contests in emerging startup communities in the middle of our country.

How can innovation and technology help in the middle?

As new technology is disproportionately displacing middle-class jobs, how can innovation help narrow the income inequality gap?

Boston Globe article titled “MIT Awards Focus on Tech That Helps Low, Middle-income Workers” focuses on MIT’s first Inclusive Innovation Competition. Erik Brynjolfsson, who helped launch the competition, points out, “Technology is creating enormous wealth and curing diseases. But a lot of people aren’t sharing in that bounty. It’s been easier to think, ‘how do I take an existing task and automate it?’ We are trying to change the conversation.”

The competition awarded prizes of $125,000 to four companies that target the “sweet spot” between technology and people to drive more innovation to underserved communities. Twenty other finalists received $25,000 each. One of the goals of the competition is to start getting more nonprofits and private investors thinking about how to ensure the innovation economy works for all.

It is tempting to get wrapped up in the excitement around the next unicorn company with a $1 billion-plus valuation, but we also need to take a step back to see not only the shooting stars, but also the entire night’s sky. Those in the middle can offer a lot – backed by hope, pride, and rigor. As educators and supporters of entrepreneurship, let’s make sure we support their opportunities.

This article was originally published on Xconomy.

Reflections on delta v 2017

mit_delta_v

It’s hard to believe I’ve recently finished my third year of guiding MIT startup teams through our delta v student venture accelerator. The 2017 cohort was another fantastic group of entrepreneurs and startups, and I look forward to seeing the places they will go as they develop their businesses and grow as individuals.

One useful exercise that we’ve done each year is to look critically at the delta v program at the end of each session and assess what went well and what could be improved. I believe this has helped us refine and grow our program, and I’d like to share some of our top findings:

Positive changes

We had great feedback from this year’s cohort, and did a comparison between 2016 and 2017. Here are some stats, and our take on what we’re doing well:

  • This was our largest cohort to date. We supported 21 teams and 65 entrepreneurs.
  • The average team size decreased from 5 members in 2016 to 3 members in 2017 – we feel that a smaller team size means more involvement in the process for each student.
  • The percentage of female entrepreneurs increased from 26% in 2016 to 45% in 2017 – we are making good strides toward gender parity and neutralizing gender bias, both important goals.
  • For the first time we expanded the delta v program with a Startup Studio in New York City supporting seven additional teams
  • The students were especially pleased with the founders’ dinner speakers and the interaction and support from our Entrepreneurs in Residence (EIRs).
  • They also generally liked the amount of programming included this year.
  • We implemented longer and more structured board meetings in response to requests made after the 2016 program; this was well received.
  • The teams closed more business during delta v than ever before, reaching more than $100K in revenue over the summer months.
  • Based on a survey of the students, the average net promoter score for the 2017 cohort was 93.6.
  • 100% of students surveyed are willing to be a reference for the program going forward.

We also reached out to our delta v board members for their feedback. Here’s what two of our board members had to say:

“Serving on a delta v board reminds me of the interdependency of the roles of ‘change agents’ and ‘game changers,’ irrespective of age or accomplishment. Board and delta v members, alike, seamlessly assume these roles while educating and constructively guiding each other to the launch milestone.”

  • Kristine Van Amsterdam, delta v board member

“As board members, we have the thrill and privilege of helping young entrepreneurs take those critical first steps to turn their ideas into real-life and life changing entities. Many of the ideas born here will become companies that impact the world.”

  • Janet Wu, delta v board member

 We’re thrilled that 100% of the 2017 board members are interested in participating in the program again next year.

Of course, there is always room for improvement. Here’s what we’re working on:

  • Our (new!) physical space is getting cramped with 21 teams.
  • Next year, we want to work more with the students to prepare them for meetings with the investment community.
  • The students gave us specific requests for new programming in areas from budgeting to negotiation to team development.
  • There was also a request for even more structure with the board, in terms of setting the agenda to focus on upcoming milestones.

We take feedback from our students and board members seriously and will be evolving the program for 2018. We wish our 2017 cohort much success! If you are interested in more detail on delta v, including seeing what some of our past alumni are doing, check out this year’s Martin Trust Center Annual Report.

MIT delta v 2017: Ready to Change the World!

demo day pic 2017Are you ready to be inspired? MIT’s student venture accelerator, delta v, revealed itself to the world at our 2017 Demo Day on September 9. It was a fantastic culmination to this year’s program and our students are ready change the world with their startup companies.

I want to thank the students, our speaker Shireen Yates from Nima, the staff at the Martin Trust Center, and our live and online audiences at Demo Day. I invite you to watch the video and view the entire program to see our entrepreneurs pitch their startups.

This year, delta v hosted the largest cohort to date with 21 teams.  In addition to bringing a wide range of skill sets to the program, our 2017 cohort was the most diverse in gender and ethnic background, and had a worldwide perspective with representation from many different countries. This had a tremendous benefit in terms of networking and the teams helping each other solve challenges, supporting the philosophy that diversity fuels innovation. The teams took their skills in science, technology, design, management, and entrepreneurship to tackle everything from fresh water scarcity, climate change, and different ways of producing energy to the opioid crisis, soaring healthcare costs and gender inequality in healthcare to global financial transparency – all big problems in need of innovative solutions.

At delta v, our goal isn’t to tell the students how to do things, our goal is to lead them to their own conclusions. We are looking for students with the “heart of an entrepreneur” who are looking to solve the world’s really hard problems. We give them the opportunity to fail and get feedback in a safe environment. Plus, they learn from each other. Our value add is to help guide students who are ready to positively impact the world.

demo day 2Here’s a brief overview of each startup that presented at Demo Day (in alphabetical order). Remember them. It’s likely you’ll be able to point back and say, “I saw them when they were just a startup at MIT…”

 

 

Alba

Focused on empowering women to achieve their goals, Alba is a care giving marketplace for parents in Latin America.

Biobot Analytics

Biobot’s mission is to equip cities with data to build healthier and safer communities. Biobot Analytics’ first application is generating a new type of data on the opioid epidemic. (See recent coverage of the team in Boston Magazine.)

Blockparty

Blockparty tackles food insecurity through fun, engaging cooking classes where young professionals can learn a new recipe while also providing meals to our neighbors in need.

Bloomer Health Tech

Bloomer Health Tech is transforming heart health and quality of life for women suffering from, or at risk of, heart disease. Bloomer delivers effortless and comfortable medical-grade sensors embedded in a woman’s bra to monitor multiple biomarkers using patent-pending advanced fabrics and algorithms.

Divaqua

Divaqua is committed to making water scarcity yesterday’s problem. They are developing and commercializing higher performing, safer, and more cost-effective technology to treat wastewater.

InfiniteCooling

Power plants, the US’ largest water consumer, use 139 billion gallons of fresh water every day, which amounts to 50% of total US freshwater withdrawals. Infinite Cooling captures water in evaporative cooling tanks and reintroduces it into a powerplant’s cooling cycle.

Klarity

Klarity’s vision is to provide widespread access to concise and trustworthy legal advice through intelligent technology using machine learning to reduce the time spent on contract review.

Mayflower Venues

Mayflower Venues enables customers to create one-of-a-kind weddings and events while helping preserve unique open spaces across New England.

Mesodyne

Mesodyne is bringing portable power to those who need it most. Its breakthrough technology enables ultra-portable, reliable, and affordable energy generation for the military and beyond.

Octant

Octant’s data curation platform uses deep learning to accelerate autonomous vehicle (AV) development. Equipped with Octant’s solution, innovators can spend less time collecting and managing data, and more time improving the future of mobility.

Pine Health

Pine Health helps patients follow through on doctor’s orders by using patient data to trigger conversations with an AI-augmented health coach.

ReviveMed

ReviveMed is a precision medicine platform that aims to improve people’s health by unlocking the value of metabolomics data, allowing the right therapeutics to be delivered to the right patients.

Roots Studio

Roots Studio is a for-profit social enterprise that curates, digitizes, and markets culturally iconic artwork from indigenous and isolated artists to a global marketplace.

Sigma Ratings

Sigma Ratings is the world’s first non-credit risk rating agency and helps companies more effectively and efficiently navigate increasing regulatory challenges.

Sophia

Sophia connects patients with the right therapists for them using a data-driven matching process, creating stronger therapeutic relationships.

TradeTrack

TradeTrack aims to improve personalized customer services in the fashion industry. Their solution increases brand loyalty and helps to improve customer retention.

W8X

W8X helps athletes to become their best and strongest selves with strength training equipment that adapts to their specific needs. Inspired by robotics, W8X has developed a weight lifting system that creates resistance electrically.
Waypoint

Waypoint uses augmented reality (AR) to help frontline workers rapidly capture, access, and scale expert knowledge.

The delta v teams also present to alumni and investors in New York City and San Francisco – quite the exciting month!

See more coverage of Demo Day in the MIT News and MIT Sloan Management newsroom.

demo day 1

Paris Reflections: Entrepreneurship Past, Present and Future

Paris reflectionsI recently had the incredible opportunity to deliver the keynote presentation at the Paris School of Business’ symposium on Entrepreneurial Research: Past, Present and Future. First, I’d like to again thank the school for this experience and my gracious host, Dr. Adnane Maalaoui, for introducing me to his students and giving this first-timer a glimpse of Paris.

I had promised to share what I learned at the symposium, and I will attempt to give you the highlights. I found that there is tremendous research being done by doctoral students who want to make an impact on entrepreneurship education as well as to share the work of the researchers who came before them. (Interestingly, entrepreneurship as a research field has only existed for the past 30 to 50 years.) The students at the Paris School of Business and affiliated universities in Europe provided a look into the future of entrepreneurship education during the symposium, and it is bright:

  • The educational ecosystems is vibrant with dedicated students and educators sharing and building on entrepreneurship research;
  • Students globally continue to be interested in entrepreneurship, but the ecosystem isn’t developed enough to deal with failure and risk in many regions;
  • It is important to remember that although at MIT we focus on innovation-driven entrepreneurship, there are entrepreneurs around the world creating small sustainable business that support families and change the lives of many (but are not necessarily innovation-driven);
  • Current cases taught to students could be updated to better reflect the changing entrepreneurial ecosystem;
  • Financing ventures continues to be a struggle particularly outside the USA;
  • Food and wine can be enhanced by rigorous debate, even in France;
  • The Eiffel Tower is even beautiful in the rain, as I learned from our final night with a dinner cruise on the Seine with students and faculty.

As an entrepreneur in a vibrant MIT ecosystem where we teach students through experience, it was inspirational to meet some of the global educators and Ph.D. students who are continually doing research that helps prepare entrepreneurs to make an impact in the world.

When I decided to pursue my doctorate at the University of Pennsylvania, I had already been an entrepreneur and business executive, but I joined UPenn’s Chief Learning Officer program and focused on work-based learning and closing the 21st century skills gap – this led me to my current role at MIT which is all about creating a learning environment for entrepreneurs. The Ph.D. students and faculty I met in Paris are developing competencies in new venture development, resource management, micro, social and strategic entrepreneurship using analytics/statistics to evaluate interventions and outcomes based on those responses.  I was able to connect with so much of their research both on an academic and practical level.

Another exciting development for French entrepreneurship was the election of President Emanuel Macron on May 7, just before the start of the symposium.  President Macron ran on a platform to make France globally competitive and is enthusiastic about startups in France. Macron’s pro-technology and pro-entrepreneurship views are discussed in this  article and this TechCrunch interview  conducted at the Consumer Electronics Show in January Las Vegas, attended by 190 French startups (at the time, Macron was France’s Economy Minister). It will be interesting to watch how the French startup ecosystem progresses under this new president.

I’m also sharing some resources that may be of interest:

  • My presentation from the Symposium:

How Paris & Boston can learn from each other’s Entrepreneurship Communities,
by Trish Cotter

  • A presentation by Bill Aulet, Managing Director of the Martin Trust Center for MIT Entrepreneurship that also shares ideas on:

The Past, Present and Future of Entrepreneurship Education, by Bill Aulet

  • Great accounts to follow on Twitter:
    Paris School of Business @PSBeduParis, Grenoble Ecole de Management @Grenoble_EM, and Ecole de Commerce @EDCofficiel (The first is in in English, the second two are in French – but Twitter has a handy translate button.)

    Also, make sure you are following the Martin Trust Center at MIT … @EshipMIT !

In closing, I’ll share the words of Jean-Baptiste Say the French economist who first coined the word “entrepreneur” around the year 1800:

“The entrepreneur shifts economic resources out of an area of lower and into an area of higher productivity and greater yield.”

Bonne chance to all of our entrepreneurs!

 

Who will be among the next batch of MIT Startups?

MIT’s student venture accelerator program has kicked off for 2017!

delta v is a unique program that provides a capstone educational opportunity for MIT student entrepreneurs, and prepares them to hit escape velocity and launch into the real world.

“delta v” literally means a change in velocity, and we believe this truly captures what happens to these students when they join us for MIT’s accelerator program. (Our program was previously called the Global Founders’ Skill Accelerator – we changed the name last year.)

Our 2017 cohort of students has been selected, and they will begin go through “entrepreneur boot camp” this summer. Sorry, but we can’t yet release the startup names and ideas, but we have created an infographic to give you the big picture of our incoming group.

2017 delta v Cohort_JPEG

Mark your calendars for September 9.  That’s our Demo Day in Boston, when each of the companies will present to the public. (Here’s a recap of Demo Day 2016.)

We also went back to our 2016 cohort and asked for advice they could share. Here are some of the highlights:

Create the Right Team and Team Culture

Get to know the rest of the cohort early! I can’t tell you how much I wished I had gotten to know the other teams in the cohort earlier, and how sad it felt to begin bonding so late in the summer only to leave a few weeks earlier. Take initiative and invite other teams out! They won’t bite.
Kumwe Logistics

Invest in getting to know Trust Center staff and the other teams; they are as much of a resource as the funding.
Solstice

I recommend taking free personality tests and working as a team to identify work styles and potential weaknesses that both individuals and the team as a whole may face so that when these hard times hit, and they will hit, you know what to expect and can band together to push through.
Rendever

As we have moved forward and made some progress it has become even more evident that VCs and investors, especially in the seed round, are investing as much, if not more, in the team than in the business idea.
Kumwe Logistics

Communicate, Communicate, Communicate

For international team, communication is your best friend. Have a WhatsApp group, have a daily Skype call, do whatever it takes. It’s impossible to be talking too much to your fellow team members while you’re geographically separated.
Kumwe Logistics

Show up, Be Present & Network

Be present as much as possible, even if the attendance requirement says only 2 people have to be there.
Solstice

Go to every event possible. Even if you think you already know the topic, go to it anyways. Delta V brings in people at the top of their field to share their insights with the teams, take advantage of that! Other people would kill for that opportunity.
Kumwe Logistics

Simplify

Everyone has this big fetish for cool-sounding technology, especially at MIT. Talking tech helps wins competitions, but at the end of the day the only people you really need to impress are your customers (with a good product, not with the underlying tech!)
dot Learn

Promote Increased Value over Cost Savings

If I were to start over, I’d promote the time [our services] save their staff, the benefit of dealing with one company for all their needs that’s responsive, proper billing, and other similar points that our clients tell us they appreciate and are worth value [rather than just cost savings].
Kumwe Logistics

Perfect Your Pitch

One of the best things we got out of the whole exercise was the final pitch document and presentation we had. The same pitch and document has helped us get $100,000 from Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and DFID UK, along with the money we have raised from investors.
ricult

Anticipate Change & Challenges

Company culture is created predominately through the personalities and work styles of the founders and early employees. Make sure to spend time understanding what sort of culture you’re looking to build and understand that the good comes with the bad.
Rendever

There WILL be challenges and failures that lie ahead and it’s helpful to understand how your team will work to overcome these hurdles.
Rendever

Prepare for After MIT

Treat Board members as valuable mentors even after the program is over.
Solstice

Take advantage of the support Network at MIT while you can, and if you’re leaving Boston, try to build a support network (friends/entrepreneurs/etc..) wherever you go. The struggle is real, and the real world can be cold and lonely.
dot Learn

Great advice from our last group of entrepreneurs!  I’m looking forward to spending the summer with our incoming class.

Innovation: 2017 Style

fuse_2Here in Massachusetts, we tend to get somewhat of an inferiority complex. Maybe it’s those Puritan roots. We have it stuck in our heads … “Boston’s not as big as NYC” or “We’re not as innovative as Silicon Valley” …

Wait?! Bloomberg says that Massachusetts is the most innovative state in America … for the second year in a row? That’s pretty cool. Take that inferiority complex!

According to the Bloomberg ranking, Massachusetts scored 95 out of a possible 100 points, followed by California, Washington, New Jersey, and Maryland. The six equally weighted metrics included:

  • R&D intensity;
  • Productivity;
  • High-tech density;
  • Concentration of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) employment
  • Science and engineering degree holders; and
  • Patent activity.

Massachusetts earned the ranking by producing more science and engineering jobs and by creating jobs in those industries. Current figures show a 2.9% unemployment rate in Mass, compared to a 4.6% national average. The state’s universities were also noted, included Harvard and MIT.

At MIT’s Martin Trust Center, we have the privilege of seeing that innovation every day.  And, it’s the type of innovation gets spread around the world. CES, the annual Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas is known for attracting and showcasing the world’s latest and greatest consumer innovations.  This year, atwoboo least eight companies with MIT roots showed off their cutting-edge products at the show. One of those, Woobo, is an alumnus of our MIT student venture accelerator program (now known as delta v). The company is using robotics and artificial intelligence to make a smart “imaginary friend” for young children and plans to launch the product this year.

Another MIT accelerator program alumnus, Accion Systems, was honored recently in BostInno’s 17 Startups to Watch in 2017. Definitely not in the consumer accionrealm, Accion is developing revolutionary propulsion for satellites which will make space more accessible and affordable across industries. The company itself is seeing quite a bit of propulsion here in Massachusetts, with funding from the Department of Defense and a Series A round last year, along with numerous awards.

img_0424And, here’s something pretty cool that’s happening in innovation right now: is MIT fuse program.  MIT fuse is the Trust Center’s entrepreneurial program that takes place every January during Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is January 9 to February 1 this year. The MIT fuse teams essentially take over the Martin Trust Center during these three and a half weeks, receive mentor advice from our Entrepreneurs in Residence, and learn from startup founders who have preceded them.

One intriguing company in the current MIT fuse program is Waypoint Labs.
Waypoint is building a platform for creating and extracting spatial data and insights for augmented reality (AR) applications. One possible applicawaypoint-labstion is using the Microsoft Hololens to enable non-pharmacy hospital staff to fill prescriptions quickly and without errors. The company was invited by AT&T to participate in its inaugural AR/VR Challenge at CES 2017, where it won the $20K grand prize after demoing its prototype to over 250 conference attendees.

At MIT, the students we mentor want to make a positive impact in the world, and our programs give these students the opportunity to do so.  Here’s to an innovative 2017!